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Thu 5 December 2019
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Footage reveals the British commentator, promoted by Donald Trump, promulgating the conspiracy theory of Muslim immigration that inspired the Christchurch terror attack.


Katie Hopkins has claimed she is “a minority as a white Brit” in the UK, that policing, housing, finance and law had been “divested” to Muslims, and that there is a “Biblical fight to be had”, footage discovered by Byline Times reveals.

At a UKIP branch meeting in Liverpool, Hopkins can be heard to say: “I’m sick of being told there’s no place at the local school for my kids because other kids come first, because they’re from minority groups when I’m a minority as a white Brit in my own goddamn country.”

The Great Replacement Theory is a right-wing conspiracy theory, originating from France, claiming that a white Christian European population is being systematically replaced by non-European, non-white, Muslim immigrants.

The Christchurch gunman’s so-called manifesto was titled The Great Replacement and a report by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD), written in the wake of the attack, has warned that this ideology is becoming a part of mainstream political discourse. 

The ISD’s report found that Donald Trump’s @POTUS account was one of the top 10 social media accounts that “engaged with the conspiracy theory and its support networks”. It is one of only two non-French accounts in the top 10.

Trump has retweeted Hopkins from his personal account, which has nearly 62 million followers. He recently retweeted Hopkins praising right-wing leaders, and following his state visit to the UK, quote-tweeted an attack on Sadiq Khan by Hopkins.

In her speech to the UKIP branch meeting at the end of May, Hopkins attacked London Mayor Sadiq Khan at length, claiming he wants to turn London “into an Islamic city that he can govern over”.

She said: “I’m not sure we will ever have a non-Muslim mayor ever again, because when you pack a Muslim population into the boroughs of London as densely as they have… Tower Hamlets, the most Muslims in the UK, the most densely packed population, the fewest number of white Brits in that borough; Newham, right behind it, the second-highest number of Muslims in the UK, why do you think that is? Do you think that happened by chance or by design to keep the London mayor in Muslim hands. Our capital city, our capital city, your capital city is run by a Muslim mayor who has a Muslim police association, a Muslim housing association.”

Hopkins attacked London Mayor Sadiq Khan at length, claiming he wants to turn London “into an Islamic city that he can govern over”.

In the video, published by Merseyside Network News, Hopkins criticised Khan for hosting an Eid celebration in Trafalgar Square “after the Christchurch killing in the mosque”. She said that the Christchurch killing was “a terrible horrific event that should have never happened”. She then returned to criticising Khan for “playing out the Muslim call to prayer from Trafalgar Square”, describing it as “the future I see for our capital city” and speaks of being outnumbered as a white Briton.

In her one-hour speech, Hopkins also asked “how long will it be until there’s a Muslim party in the UK?” and suggested that white British people will have to find somewhere to go, asking “Where is our Israel going to be?”, describing this as “the question of our time”. She suggested that South Africa’s 8% white population offers a “glimpse into our future”, and mentions discredited examples of allegedly anti-white farm murders.


The man shown in the video introducing Hopkins is referred to as “Paul”. He is Thomas Paul Kangley, who stood as a UKIP council candidate in Kensington and Fairfield in Liverpool.

Kangley confirmed he chaired this meeting to Byline Times, describing it as “excellent”, and said that Hopkins was well-received by all. Kangley, who was dubbed “Brexiteer of the Week” by The New European for his leaflet that said UKIP put “Britain and The British First”, has previously been the subject of media attention. 

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In the early 2000s, Kangley lived in Dublin and established the Irish People’s Party (IPP). He unsuccessfully ran for a Dublin council seat. The Guardian reported Nick Griffin’s British National Party had offered financial support to Kangley and was in “frequent contact” with the IPP. Kangley believes, the report says, that “most female Nigerians arriving in Ireland are already pregnant so they can take advantage of nationality rights”. The Guardian reported the IPP wanted the Irish Government to ban asylum seekers. 

UKIP’s membership policy requires applicants to affirm that they are “not and have never been a member of the British National Party, National Front, British Freedom Party, British People’s Party, English Defence League, Britain First or the UK First Party”. It is unclear if cooperation and offers of financial support with the British National Party are acceptable.

How long will it be until there’s a Muslim party in the UK?

Hopkins was due to speak at the UKIP South East Conference in Eastbourne alongside failed UKIP MEP candidate Carl Benjamin on Saturday, but her appearance was cancelled by Eastbourne Council, which runs the conference venue. She spoke instead at the reception dinner.

Henry Dyer is a freelance journalist. He can be found on @direthoughts on Twitter.

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