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Sat 17 August 2019
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Arnold Le Goeuil talks to Albrecht Meier, Journalist at Taggespiegel about the upcoming European elections and what they say about the political future of Germany

In Germany, the far-right populist Alternative für Deutschland has sharply increased its score in just a few years, from being unknown in 2013 to nearly 100 MPs in 2017. It threatens established parties’ strongholds, in Bavaria for the CDU-CSU or in East Germany for the SPD.

AfD could achieve a score between 10 and 13 percent, far from the sky-high 22 percent the Front National has in France or the 32 percent Liga in Italy.

But even with its large MPs group in the Bundestag – the third one – the party is isolated as all parties have agreed not to conclude alliances at the federal level nor in the Landers. And with a political system based on talks and consensus in which parties are unlikely to get an overall majority, there is little chance the AfD could push forward its political agenda any further soon. The only way could be a sharp move to the right from the CDU-CSU which is underneath.

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Albrecht Meier from the Taggespiegel explains that the new CDU leader, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer (AKK) “has hinted a possible hardening of Germany’s migration policy, but this is mere rhetoric for the time being. The CDU does not want to scare away liberal voters who have adhered to the party during the tenure of the party presidency of Angela Merkel.

Any further move may be determined after the European elections in which the AfD could achieve a score between 10 and 13 percent, far from the sky-high 22 percent the Front National has in France or the 32 percent Liga in Italy.

The AfD seems to be the last wagon of the populist train and according to Albrecht Meier “despite a general trend of more populist MEPs due to go to Strasbourg next July, the AfD might not even obtain the same score that it had achieved at last last general elections in Germany (12,6 per cent).

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